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Hosts
Ulrika Jonsson (1992–2000)
John Fashanu (1992–1996, 1999–2000)
Jeremy Guscott (1997–1998)
Mike Adamle (1995–1996) (International Gladiators)
Kimberley Joseph (1995–1996) (International Gladiators)
Mike Hammond (1997)
Glenn Hicks (1998)
Ian Wright (2008–2009)
Kirsty Gallacher (2008)
Caroline Flack (2008–2009)
Announcers
John Sachs (1992–2000)
Alan Parry (2008–2009)
Broadcast
UK Gladiators
ITV: 10 October 1992 – 1 January 2000
UK Gladiators 2008
Sky1: 11 May 2008 – 25 October 2009
Packagers
LWT/The Samuel Goldwyn Company (1992–2000)
Shine Productions (2008–2009)
Distributor
ITV Studios

Gladiators was a competition television program that matched a cast of amateur athletes against each other, as well as against the show's own "gladiators", in contests of strength and agility.

GameplayEdit

The series involved contestants battling against a 'Gladiator' in a number of events to secure points for the final event, The Eliminator. Typically, four contenders would appear in each episode, two male (Red and Blue) and two female (Pink and Yellow), and each contender would compete in five or six events, depending on the series or time constraints.

In each event, the contenders would score a number of points (usually ten for a win). Typically, both male and female contenders would compete in the same events; however, during Series 6, this format was removed, and female contenders would play easier games, whilst the male contenders would play more difficult games. Once all five/six games were played, the number of points was totalled and the contestant with the highest number of points would get a headstart in The Eliminator assault course with every point ahead of their competitor worth half a second. The winner of The Eliminator then advanced to compete in the next round.

A typical series contained fifteen episodes – eight heats, four quarter finals, two semi-finals and the grand final. Occasionally, a celebrity or charity special would be broadcast after the grand final. Mini series, such as the final season (Series 8), would consist of 3 episodes: 2 heats and a grand final.

Original Gladiators eventsEdit

The following events appeared during the original eight-year run of the UK series of Gladiators. In total there were 24 televised events with the eliminator being the only event to appear on all shows.

The event line-up changed from series to series, with new events being added every series, however over the years some events were dropped due to safety reasons (Joust, Pole-Axe, Pyramid and Tilt), some never made it onto screen (Breakthrough & Conquer and Cyclotron) and some just disappeared (Pursuit). Below is a detailed description of all events.

AtlaspheresEdit

  • First appearance: Series 1, 1992 – Heat 1
  • Last appearance: 1999 – Battle Of The Giants
  • Time limit: 60 seconds
  • Contenders: 2 / Gladiators: 2
  • Points: 3 points for each "goal"

The first event ever shown on Gladiators in 1992. The two contenders and two Gladiators were caged in large Atlaspheres that they had to propel from within. The contenders' task was to roll the spheres onto any of four scoring pods. They were given one minute to score as many points as they could in this fashion, whilst the Gladiator had to block the contenders from scoring.

The event's signature tune was We Will Rock You by Queen. The event was sometimes modified for celebrity specials, in which either 2 Gladiators faced 3 contenders or 3 Gladiators faced 3 contenders from a standing start.

CatapultEdit

  • First appearance: Series 7, 1998 – Heat 4
  • Last appearance: Series 7, 1998 – Quarter Final 3
  • Time limit: 60 seconds
  • Contenders: 2 / Gladiators: 2
  • Points: 2 points for each "goal"

Two contenders would face two Gladiators. Each competitor was attached to a bungee cord. On the whistle they would begin to bounce up and down. Situated above each contender was a ball tray. The contenders scored by throwing the balls into hexagonal goals situated behind the Gladiators, whilst the Gladiators attempted to stop the contenders from scoring.

This event had heavy modification to its gameplay between its initial concept and first outing, with the 1998 programme mentioning a volleyball-style net situated between contenders and Gladiators. It was however modified into the event that made it onto screen as this was deemed more exciting.

Danger ZoneEdit

  • First appearance: Series 1, 1992 – Heat 1
  • Last appearance: Series 7, 1998 – Quarter 3
  • Time limit: 60 seconds
  • Contenders: 1 / Gladiators: 1
  • Points:
    • Series 1: 10 points for hitting either target.
    • Series 2 to 8: 10 points for hitting the upper target, 5 points for hitting the lower target.
    • All series: 1 point for each weapon fired if incomplete

Contenders, one at a time, would make their way across the arena whilst dodging tennis balls fired at high speed by the Gladiator. Between the start and finish were stations where the contender was shielded from the Gladiator's fire, and where they could attempt, using a provided weapon, to hit a target above the Gladiator. The contender had to be quick, as each of their stations would explode every ten seconds and render that station's weapon unusable (a difference from the US version, which did not have the limit). Successful shots ended the game earning them 10 points. However, contestants could still earn 5 points by simply reaching the end of the course without being hit. Reaching the end originally scored 10 points in series 1, and was reduced to 5 points in series 2 onwards. If the contender was hit directly by a tennis ball (rebounds off the floor didn't count), they were out.

The game was based on the American Gladiators Assault game.

DogfightEdit

  • First appearance: Series 7, 1998 – Heat 1
  • Last appearance: Series 7, 1998 – Semi-Final 2
  • Time limit: 30 seconds
  • Contenders: 1 / Gladiators: 1
  • Points: 10 points for 2 hits, 5 points for 1 hit

This event was one on one as contender and Gladiator and strapped into an airship situated 30 feet above the arena floor. The aim was to hit the glowing chest plate on the opponent using a "Combat Club". 2 hits and they were out and despatched to the net below. One hit from the contender earned 5 points, while sending the Gladiator flying earned them 10. A hit was registered by a Pyro explosion.

DuelEdit

  • First appearance: Series 1, 1992 – Heat 1
  • Last appearance: Series 8, 1999 – Final
  • Time limit: 30 seconds
  • Contenders: 1 / Gladiators: 1
  • Points: 10 points for knocking Gladiator off, 5 points for remaining on until the end of the time limit

A contender and a Gladiator were each placed atop an elevated platform a short distance apart. Armed with a pugil stick (which was usually mistaken for a huge cotton bud), they attempted to cause the other to fall from their platform. This could be achieved with either an offensive or a defensive strategy, although some contenders were disqualified if they made no attacking move towards the Gladiator and vice versa. Losing a pugil stick resulted in an automatic loss.

The event was known as Joust in the US series.


GauntletEdit

  • First appearance: Series 2, 1993 – Heat 6
  • Last appearance: Series 8, 1999 – Final
  • Time limit: 30 seconds
  • Contenders: 1 / Gladiators: 3 (series 2); 5 (series 3 to 8)
  • Points:
    • Series 2: 3 points for each zone completed, plus one bonus point for the fastest time
    • Series 2 quarter-finals onwards: 10 points for finishing first, 5 for finishing second
    • Series 3 to 6: 10 points for finishing in under 20 seconds, 5 points for under 30 seconds
    • Series 7 to 8: 10 points for finishing, otherwise 1 point for each sector completed

A contender had to "run the Gauntlet" by passing Gladiators armed with ramrods. This became one of the staple events after a revamp in the 1994 series in which the contenders had to run a narrower Gauntlet against five Gladiators, the second and fourth having power pads to slow the contenders down.

This appeared in the Sky One series of Gladiators in 2008-2009.

Hang ToughEdit

  • First appearance: Series 1, 1992 – Heat 1
  • Last appearance: Series 8, 1999 – Final
  • Time limit: 60 seconds
  • Contenders: 1 / Gladiators: 1
  • Points: 10 points for reaching the Gladiator Platform, 5 points for "hanging tough" in the scoring zone when the whistle blows

A game of aerial chess. The contender and the Gladiator would begin on opposite sides of the arena, on raised platforms. Between them hung a grid of suspended rings, similar to gymnastic rings. The contender's task was to reach the Gladiator's platform by swinging between the rings, scoring 10 points if successful. The Gladiator meanwhile, swinging in the opposite direction, would attempt to intercept the contender and pull them down.

This was revamped with the water element, rather than a crash mat in the Sky One series.

Hit & RunEdit

  • First appearance: Wembley Live, 1994
  • Last appearance: Series 7, 1998 – Heat 3
  • Time limit: 30 seconds
  • Contenders: 1 / Gladiators: 4
  • Points: 2 points for each crossing

Known as Cannonball Run in its roadtest in the Wembley Live shows, the contender had 30 seconds to run back and forth across the suspension bridge, scoring two points for each crossing. Four Gladiators (two on each side of the bridge) would attempt to knock the contender off using four four-foot demolition balls.

This game made it to the US revival in 2008.

JoustEdit

  • First appearance: Wembley Live, 1993
  • Last appearance: Series 4, 1995 – Quarter Final 1
  • Time limit: 30 seconds
  • Contenders: 1 / Gladiators: 1
  • Points: 10 for knocking the Gladiator off, 5 points for remaining on the "Sky Bike" for the full 30 seconds

Another adaptation of Duel in which contender and Gladiator were sat on skybikes that twisted, bucked and spun like a rocking rodeo. Both participants had combat clubs with which they attempted to knock each other off. In the Wembley Live shows, the bikes were large and only a few feet off the ground and contestants fought using pugil sticks. For the televised series, the bikes were made smaller, were further off the ground and combat clubs used.

A significant majority of games ended in a time limit draw and this event was quickly phased out, making very few appearances before being axed after the 1995 series.

Not to be confused with the American Gladiators Joust, which is known as Duel in UK Gladiators and the International version.

PendulumEdit

  • First appearance: Series 4, 1995 – Heat 2
  • Last appearance: Series 7, 1998 – Final
  • Time limit: 60 seconds
  • Contenders: 1 / Gladiators: 1
  • Points:
    • Series 4 to 6: 10 points for remaining on the Pendulum for 60 seconds, 5 points for staying on for 40 seconds.
    • Series 7 to 8: 2 points for each of 3 upper sectors hit, 4 points for lower sector (maximum of 10).

The "Pendulum" was a ball 5 metres (23') in diameter, which hung from the roof of the arena, 40 feet (12.23m) above the ground. The event was contender versus Gladiator in a game of hide and seek. On the whistle, the ball would begin to swing from side to side. The aim of the contender was to avoid the Gladiator, who had to track the contender down and remove the Velcro tag from their back. Once this was done, the game was over. If the contender or Gladiator fell off, the remaining participant won. In 1998, the rules were changed: the contender had to hit four lit sectors in different positions around the ball, while still avoiding being caught up by the Gladiator.

Pendulum was originally planned to debut in the Sheffield Live 1995 shows, but had to be dropped as the safety net was too big to fit in the arena. Instead Joust was played.

Pole-AxeEdit

  • First run: Series 3, 1994 – Heat 8 until International Gladiators 2, 1995 – Final
  • Second run: Series 6, 1997 – Heat 8 until Series 7, 1998 – Semi-Final 1
  • Time limit: None
  • Contenders: 1 / Gladiators: 1
  • Points: 10 points for hitting the top first and "pole-axing" the Gladiator

A contender and Gladiator would each climb a 36-foot pole fitted with helically-arranged pegs. The first to the top would press a button, which retracted the pegs on the opponent's pole causing them to fall to the six-foot crash mat below.

This was another event that was axed in 1996 because of injuries to Gladiators and contenders. It was revived in 1997 with safety harnesses to stop the "freefall" aspect of the event. This also meant a run up to mount the pole and a higher climb.

PowerballEdit

  • First appearance: Series 2, 1993 – Heat 1
  • Last appearance: Series 8, 1999 – Final
  • Time limit: 60 seconds
  • Contenders: 2 / Gladiators: 3 (series 2 to 6); 2 (series 7 and 8)
  • Points: Outer Basket 2 Points, Centre Basket 3 Points

This original US series game debuted in the second British series (1993). This kind of cross between basketball and rugby was introduced in which two contenders faced three Gladiators on the Powerball pitch. Contenders had 60 seconds to place balls in the five scoring baskets on the pitch (2 points for a score in one of the four outer baskets and 3 points for the middle) whilst the Gladiators had to tackle the contenders, preventing them from scoring (though head-high tackles and similar moves were illegal for safety reasons, as in the US version, and would result in the gladiator being disqualified). This event became one of the most played events during Gladiators. From 1998 onwards, the rules were changed – there were only two Gladiators and each one targeted a specific contender. This was the only event that its last appearance was in Series 8 and its first appearance was not in Series 1.

The time difference (60 seconds vs 45 seconds for the original US version) was a major difference between the two versions; the 2008 US revival adopted the British version's 60 second clock.

PursuitEdit

  • First appearance: Series 3, 1994 – Heat 7
  • Last appearance: Series 5, 1996 – Southern Semi-Final 2
  • Time limit: None
  • Contenders: 2 / Gladiators: 2
  • Points: 10 points for finishing the course first, 5 points for finishing second. Points deducted for infringement: 1 for foot off the snake beam or wire bridge; 2 for missing a corner marker on the snake beam.

Two contenders would race against each other over an obstacle course, chased by two Gladiators. The course comprised a snake beam, wire bridge, hand ladder, two web traps, a high and low wall and a sprint finish. The course was rearranged for 1995 onwards and the rules were tightened up somewhat with penalty points being introduced for coming off the beam or missing rungs on the ladder.

PyramidEdit

  • First run: Series 3, 1994 – Heat 2 until Battle Of Champions, 1995
  • Second run: Series 6, 1997 – Heat 7 until Series 6, 1997 – Quarter Final 3
  • Time limit: 60 seconds
  • Contenders: 2 / Gladiators: 2
  • Points: 10 points for reaching the top first, 5 points for reaching the top second

Two contenders and two Gladiators would face each other on a giant black and white pyramid. The contenders aim was to reach the summit, whilst the Gladiators aim was to stop them. This event was axed in 1996 after Jet was very badly injured in the live show. This caused her retirement from Gladiators.

It was reintroduced in 1997 with smaller steps and a red step which, once reached, the contender has free run to the top. However, it was very unpopular with viewers as it lacked the excitement of the original and consequently it was axed again. The "red step" rule formed the basis of the two-tiered scoring system in the 2008 US revival (five for crossing the dotted step, five more for pressing the buzzer), much of which is based on the UK series.

SkytrakEdit

  • First appearance: Series 2, 1993 – Heat 1
  • Last appearance: Series 7, 1998 – Heat 7
  • Time limit: None
  • Contenders: 2 / Gladiators: 2
  • Points: 10 points for finishing first, 5 points for finishing second, no points if caught up by the Gladiator

The most spectacular event of early series was brought in for Series 2 (1993), Two contenders and two Gladiators were suspended 40 feet in the air on the Skytrak course - an upside down Scalextric-style figure of eight. Contenders had a 10-yard head start over the Gladiators. Each contender had a trailing detonator button behind them, and failed if the Gladiator pressed this button (thereby deemed to have caught up with the contender). Should this happen, a small shower of sparks was released from the contender's vest.

Sumo BallEdit

  • First appearance: Wembley Live, 1996
  • Last appearance: Series 7, 1998 – Quarter Final 3
  • Time limit: 30 seconds
  • Contenders: 1 / Gladiators: 1
  • Points: 10 points for the Gladiator off the platform, 5 points for remaining on the platform for the full 30 seconds

The only new game for Series 5 (1996) and first road-tested in the 1996 live shows, the contender and Gladiator were on a large circular platform in which a large red sumo ball hung from the ceiling. Both participants had 30 seconds to push the opponent off the platform using the 75 kg Sumo Ball.

Suspension BridgeEdit

  • First appearance: Wembley Live, 1993
  • Last appearance: Series 7, 1998 – Heat 3
  • Time limit : 60 seconds (series 2 to 3); 30 seconds (series 4 to 7)
  • Contenders: 1 / Gladiators: 1
  • Points: 10 points for reaching the other side, 5 points for remaining on the bridge until the end of the time limit.

An adaptation of the Duel event in which contender and Gladiator, armed with hammerheads (pugil sticks during its road-testing), faced each other on the Suspension Bridge. Unlike the other combat events Duel and Joust, Suspension Bridge only saw three draws over its entire run. The contender would also receive 10 points if the gladiator falls off the bridge or if the gladiator is disqualified.

SwingshotEdit

  • First appearance: Series 1, 1992 - Heat 1
  • Last appearance: Series 8, 1999 - Final
  • Time limit: 60 seconds
  • Contenders: 2 / Gladiators: 2
  • Points: 1 point for each yellow ball, 2 for each blue ball, 3 for each red ball.

In this bungee-fest, contestants have to grab coloured balls from a central column then bounce back and put them in their scoring baskets. Gladiators would time their jumps to block the contenders' from doing so.

TightropeEdit

  • First appearance: Series 6, 1997 – Heat 1
  • Last appearance: Series 7, 1998 – Final
  • Time limit: None
  • Contenders: 1 / Gladiators: 1
  • Points: 10 points for hitting the "Impact Cushion" first

The only new event of 1997, a one-on-one race. The contender and Gladiator were harnessed up on the Tightrope 30 feet above the arena floor. On the whistle they would race up the rope to the halfway platform. Once there, they would hit a button to activate the Zip Line, then hook up to this and slide back down to hit the "Impact Cushion" at the end, therefore winning the event and sending their opponent flying in a shower of sparks.

TiltEdit

  • First appearance: Wembley Live, 1993
  • Last appearance: Series 4, 1995 – Heat 8
  • Time limit: 30 seconds per bout
  • Contenders: 1 / Gladiators: 1
  • Points: 5 points for pulling the Gladiator off, 2 points for remaining on until the end of the time limit

An aerial tug of war in which both contender and Gladiator were on tilting platforms. The contender was placed on the lower platform, which was tilted back, and the Gladiator was placed on the higher platform tilted forwards. Because of their weight advantage, the Gladiators had the harder job of having to tilt their table back in order to get any leverage on the rope. Two 30-second bouts were played.

This event proved unpopular with the Gladiators and after serious injuries to both Panther and Nightshade, Tilt was axed after the 1995 series. This, however, became the basis for the American Gladiators event "Tug-O-War", which became a safer (due to the platforms being at the same height with each other) and more popular variation.

VertigoEdit

  • First appearance: Series 7, 1998 – Heat 1
  • Last appearance: Series 7, 1998 – Final
  • Time limit: None
  • Contenders: 1 / Gladiators: 1
  • Points: 10 points for reaching the end ring first, otherwise 1 point for each pole reached

Another one-on-one race. Five 27-foot (8.3m) poles lay ahead of the competitors. On the whistle they had to climb the first one to the top. Once there, they would swing their pole and had to use this method to transfer to each of the remaining poles. They had to complete a left-to-right swing before transferring. They did this until the end where a silver ring awaited, the first to grab this won the event in a shower of sparks.

The WallEdit

  • First appearance: Series 1, 1992 – Heat 1
  • Last appearance: Series 8, 1999 – Final
  • Time limit: 60 seconds
  • Contenders: 2 / Gladiators: 2
  • Points:
    • Series 1 to 2: 10 points for reaching the top of the Wall
    • Series 3 to 8: 10 points for reaching the top first, 5 points for reaching the top second or remaining on the Wall until the end of the time limit.

Contenders attempted to climb up a 36 ft climbing wall covered with hand and foot holds while the Gladiators gave chase, and attempted to pull them off.

In the first series the female contenders received a 20-second head-start (falling to 15 seconds in the semi-finals and final); while the men received a 15-second head-start (falling to 10 seconds in the semi-finals and final).

In later series the head-starts were standardised at 10 seconds for female contenders and 7 seconds for the male contenders.

WhiplashEdit

  • First appearance: Series 4, 1995 – Heat 1
  • Last appearance: Battle Of Gladiators, 1999
  • Time limit: 30 seconds
  • Contenders: 1 / Gladiators: 1
  • Points: 10 points for pulling the Gladiator out of the ring

A tug of war type game. The contender and the Gladiator would grip a "dog bone" and the contender had to use this to pull the Gladiator out of the ring or to obtain the "dog bone," sometimes known as "own the bone". No wrenching or pulling was permitted on the Gladiator's part, their role was strictly defence. However, the contender could use any means to remove the Gladiator. The "dog bone" was changed in later seasons and was designed to keep both contender and gladiator from letting go and making for more exciting bouts.

EliminatorEdit

  • First appearance: Series 1, 1992 – Heat 1
  • Last appearance: Series 8, 1999 – Final
  • Time limit: None
  • Contenders: 2 / Gladiators: None

The final event, and the only event seen in every episode. This was a contender against contender obstacle course. The first player to complete the Eliminator course would win the show and progress to the next round.

The whole show was set up for this. The points gathered throughout the show were used to determine a head start. For every point the contender with the higher score was ahead, a 0.5 second head start would be given.

The course was: High/Low Beams, Rope Climb, Hand Ladder (Women), Hand Bike (Men), Rolling Bridge, Cargo Net, Zipline, Balance Beam, Travelator and Rope Swing through Paper Burst.

Unused events Edit

The two events in this section never made it to any televised series.

Breakthrough & Conquer Edit

  • First appearance: Wembley Live, 1993
  • Last appearance: Wembley Live, 1993
  • Time limit: Breakthrough - None / Conquer - 15 seconds
  • Contenders: 1 / Gladiators: 2 (1 Breakthrough, 1 Conquer)
  • Points: 5 points for reaching "End Zone" in Breakthrough, 5 points for removing Gladiator from ring in Conquer.

This two-part event (which had proved popular in the American series) was road-tested in the 1993 Wembley Live series, but it was never played in any televised series (although clips of it were shown in the 1993 opening show).

For the first part of the event, the contender, armed with a rugby ball, had to get past a Gladiator without being tackled, gaining 5 points if successful. Any foul by a gladiator (illegal strike to the head, not in the five-yard zone) also was an automatic win.

For the second part, the contender was placed in a small circle against a different Gladiator and had 30 seconds to remove the Gladiator from the circle, again receiving 5 points should they be successful.

Although it was never played in the series, elements of the gameplay were used for the Powerball, Whiplash and Earthquake events.

Cyclotron Edit

This event was due to appear as a new event in the 1997 series along with Tightrope, even appearing (as a CGI image) in the opening credits.

Gameplay appeared to involve both contender and Gladiator on cycles on a rotating circular track. It appeared that the Gladiator was to chase the Contender with the aim of catching them.

The reason for Cyclotron's removal from the events roster is unknown, although it is rumoured that it was due to technical problems and certain gladiators commented on it being too difficult to play and very hard for the audience to follow.

Gladiators revival eventsEdit

DuelEdit

  • First appearance: Series 1, 2008 – Heat 1
  • Time limit: 30 seconds
  • Contenders: 1 / Gladiators: 1 (Panther, Battleaxe, Spartan, Tornado, Goliath and Atlas)
  • Points: 10 points for knocking Gladiator off, 5 points for remaining on until the end of the time limit

This event was now played above water, as opposed to a crash mat in the original series. The contender would also receive 10 points if the gladiator was disqualified.

EarthquakeEdit

  • First appearance: Series 1, 2008 – Heat 2
  • Time limit: 30 seconds
  • Contenders: 1 / Gladiators: 1 (Siren, Battleaxe, Enigma, Panther, Atlas, Warrior, Goliath, Oblivion and Doom)
  • Points: 10 points for throwing the Gladiator off, 5 points for remaining on the platform until the end of the time limit.

The Contender and Gladiator had to attempt to throw the other off a 12' platform freely suspended above crash mats. The platform was free to tilt slightly.

When the event was first shown, several warnings were issued by the referee to both Contenders and Gladiators for wrestling, not allowing the other to get up after being pushed down on the platform, and for holding onto the supporting wires. The event was plagued by stop-start calls due to vague interpretations of the rules. In the second series the platform was higher up in the studio and the fall was onto a net, not crashmats. The prohibition on wrestling was removed, as it was leading to too many interruptions. If the gladiator was disqualified the contender would be awarded 10 points.

GauntletEdit

  • First appearance: Series 1, 2008 – Heat 3
  • Time limit: 30 seconds
  • Contenders: 1
  • Gladiators: 4 in heats/5 in quarter finals onwards (Every Gladiator both male and female has appeared at least once, with the exception of Cyclone, and Tornado)
  • Points: 2 Points per Gladiator Passed, plus a bonus 2 for breaking the wall of bricks, similar to that in the eliminator, at the end.

The Contender had to run through each Gladiator, each armed with padded weaponry, such as ramrods (cylindrical sticks) and power pads (large square gloves). In the revival there were now penalties for ducking and crawling under Gladiators, resulting in Disqualification. In the heats, contenders faced four gladiators instead of five like in the original series, but from the quarter-finals onwards, the trend set by the original series was restored, and a new unnamed weapon was featured.

Hang ToughEdit

  • First appearance: Series 1, 2008 – Heat 2
  • Time limit: 60 seconds
  • Contenders: 1 / Gladiators: 1 (Siren, Cyclone, Enigma, Battleaxe, Tempest, Atlas, Tornado, Spartan, Oblivion)
  • Points: 10 points for reaching the Gladiator's platform, 5 points for remaining within the scoring zone (red rings) until the end of the time limit.

For the revival, Hang Tough was now situated above water.

If the gladiator fell off the contender would receive 10 points and a free swing to the gladiator's platform.

Hit & RunEdit

  • First appearance: Series 1, 2008 – Heat 1
  • Time limit: 30 seconds
  • Contenders: 1 / Gladiators: 4 (Every Gladiator both male and female appeared at least once)
  • Points: 2 points for each crossing

The Playing area was suspended above water, a contender had to touch a buzzer that was located on each platform. From Series 2 of the revival, contenders had a limited time after hitting each button to get to the other side. The time was eight seconds for female contenders and seven seconds for male contenders. If the contender did not hit the button in time, a light would go out and the crossing would not count. Contenders were also liable to be disqualified if they didn't keep running at all times.

PowerballEdit

  • First appearance: Series 1, 2008 – Heat 1
  • Time limit: 60 seconds
  • Contenders: 2 / Gladiators: 3 (Siren, Enigma, Panther, Battleaxe, Inferno, Amazon, Tempest/Doom, Oblivion, Predator, Spartan, Goliath, Tornado, Warrior)
  • Points: Outer Basket 2 Points, Centre Basket 5 Points

In the original series, the centre basket was worth 3 points.

PursuitEdit

  • First appearance: Series 2, 2009 – Heat 3
  • Time limit: 90 seconds
  • Contenders: 2 / Gladiators: 2 (Tempest, Enigma, Amazon/Predator, Doom, Spartan)
  • Points: 10 points for pressing the buzzer at the finish. But if caught the Contender would still receive points but would be dependent on where they were caught on the Pursuit Course. 2 points would be awarded after completing the Monkey Bars and a further 2 points would be awarded after completing the first Wall.

PyramidEdit

  • First appearance: Series 1, 2008 – Heat 1
  • Time limit: 60 seconds
  • Contenders: 2 / Gladiators: 2 (Siren, Panther, Battleaxe, Enigma, Amazon/Spartan, Tornado, Atlas, Doom, Preadator, Warrior and Goliath)
  • Points: 10 points for reaching the top first, 5 points for reaching the top second

From Series 2 if the gladiator tackled below the second step the gladiator was disqualified

RocketballEdit

  • First appearance: Series 2, 2009 – Heat 1
  • Time limit: 90 seconds
  • Contenders: 2 / Gladiators: 2 (Inferno, Siren, Enigma, Tempest, Cyclone/Predator, Spartan, Oblivion, Warrior)
  • Points: Score 1 point for the WHITE basket (lower basket) and 2 points for the YELLOW basket (higher basket).

The WallEdit

  • First appearance: Series 1, 2008 – Heat 2
  • Time limit: 60 seconds
  • Contenders: 2 / Gladiators: 2 (Tempest, Cyclone, Enigma, Predator, Tornado, Spartan, Doom)
  • Points: 10 points for reaching the top first, 5 points for reaching the top second or for remaining on the wall until the end of the time limit.

Both men and women received a 7-second head start (10 seconds in Series 1).

Suspension BridgeEdit

  • First appearance: Series 2, 2009 – Heat 4
  • Time limit : 60 seconds
  • Contenders: 1 / Gladiators: 1 (Siren, Battleaxe, Panther, Enigma/Doom, Oblivion, Goliath, Warrior)
  • Points: 10 points for reaching the other side, 5 points for remaining on the bridge until the end of the time limit.

This event was now played above water, as opposed to a crash mat in the original series. The contender would also receive 10 points for knocking the gladiator off.

The EliminatorEdit

  • First appearance: Series 1, 2008 – Heat 1
  • Time limit: None
  • Contenders: 2

The final event, the only event seen in every episode. This was a contender against contender obstacle course. The first player to complete the Eliminator course would win the show and progress to the next round.

The whole show was set up for this. The points gathered throughout the show are used to determine a head start. For every point the contender with the higher score was ahead, a 0.5 second head start would be given.

The course was:

  • Underwater Swim, Cargo Net, Cotton Reel (S1), Firemans Rope (S1), Floor Travelator, Hand Ladder/Monkey Bars (women) / Hand Bike (men), Balance Beam, Pyramid, Zipline and Travelator.

In an episode first aired 22 June 2008, it was revealed that the referee had the option to slow down the travelator in order that the competitors would be able to complete the course and to determine a winner. In this particular episode the travelator had to be completely stopped for the first time ever. Surprisingly, this measure had to be taken for both the male and female contenders.

PenaltiesEdit

In Heat 2, it was shown that falling off the men's Hand Bike incurred a 15-second penalty, where the contender had to wait at the start of the Balance Beam until they were let to continue by the referee.

In the women's Monkey Bars, a 10-second penalty was issued for falling off, and the Contender had to go back to the start of the bars.

RefereesEdit

John Anderson (1992-2008)
John Coyle (2008-2009)

The GladiatorsEdit

Female
Gladiator name Portrayed by Domestic series International series Live shows
Amazon Sharron Davies Series 4 N/A Wembley 1996
Blaze Eunice Huthart N/A N/A Sheffield 1995
Falcon Bernadette Hunt Series 2–8 International Gladiators 1–2 Wembley 1994, Sheffield 1995, Wembley 1996
Flame Kimbra Standish Series 1 N/A Wembley 1993
Fox Tammy Baker Series 6–8 The Springbok Challenge 2, MTN Gladiators 2001 The Royal Tournament 1998
Gold Lize Van Der Walt Series 6 The Springbok Challenge 2 N/A
Jet Diane Youdale Series 1–4 International Gladiators 1–2, The Ashes 1 Wembley 1993–1994, Sheffield 1995, Wembley 1996
Laser Tina Andrew Series 5 The Ashes 2, The Springbok Challenge 1 N/A
Lightning Kim Betts Series 1–8 International Gladiators 1–2, The Ashes 1–2, The Springbok Challenge 1 Wembley 1993–1994, Sheffield 1995, Wembley 1996
Nightshade Judy Simpson Series 2–5 International Gladiators 1–2, The Ashes 1 Wembley 1994, Sheffield 1995, Wembley 1996
Panther Helen O'Reilly Series 1–5 International Gladiators 2 Wembley 1993–1994, Sheffield 1995, Wembley 1996
Phoenix Sandy Young Series 1 N/A Wembley 1993
Rebel Jennifer Stoute Series 5–8 The Springbok Challenge 1 Wembley 1996, The Royal Tournament 1997
Rio Jane Omorogbe Series 5–8 The Springbok Challenge 1–2 Wembley 1996
Rocket Pauline Richards Series 6 The Springbok Challenge 1 The Royal Tournament 1998
Scorpio Nikki Diamond Series 1–3 International Gladiators 1 Wembley 1993–1994
Siren Alison Paton Series 6–8 The Springbok Challenge 2 N/A
Vogue Suzanne Cox Series 4–8 International Gladiators 2; The Ashes 1–2, The Springbok Challenge 1–2 Sheffield 1995, Wembley 1996
Zodiac Kate Staples Series 2–5 International Gladiators 1-2 Wembley 1993–1994, Sheffield 1995, Wembley 1996
Male
Gladiator name Portrayed by Domestic series International series Live shows
Ace Warren Furman Series 5–8 The Ashes 2, The Springbok Challenge 1–2 Wembley 1996
Bullit Mike Harvey N/A The Legends Series 2010 Wembley 1993
Cobra Michael Willson Series 1–8 International Gladiators 1–2, The Springbok Challenge 2 Wembley 1993–1994, Sheffield 1995, Wembley 1996
Diesel Darren Crawford Series 7–8 N/A N/A
Hawk Aleks Georgijev Series 1 N/A Wembley 1993
Hunter James Crossley Series 2–8 International Gladiators 1–2, The Ashes 1–2, The Springbok Challenge 1–2 Wembley 1994, Sheffield 1995, Wembley 1996; The Royal Tournament 1997-1998
Khan Radosev Nekic Series 6 N/A The Royal Tournament 1998
Raider Carlton Headley Series 4 International Gladiators 2 Sheffield 1995
Rhino Mark Smith Series 4–8 International Gladiators 2, The Ashes 1–2, The Springbok Challenge 1–2 Sheffield 1995, Wembley 1996, The Royal Tournament 1997
Saracen Mike Lewis Series 1–8 International Gladiators 1, The Ashes 2, The Springbok Challenge 1–2 Wembley 1993–1994, Sheffield 1995, Wembley 1996
Shadow Jefferson King Series 1–3 International Gladiators 1 Wembley 1993–1994
Trojan Mark Griffin Series 2–5 International Gladiators 1–2 Wembley 1993–1994, Sheffield 1995, Wembley 1996
Vulcan John Seru Series 7–8 International Gladiators 2, The Ashes 1–2, Australian Gladiators 1–3 N/A
Warrior Michael Ahearne Series 1–6 International Gladiators 1–2, The Ashes 1 Wembley 1993–1994, Sheffield 1995, Wembley 1996, The Royal Tournament 1997
Wolf Michael Van Wijk Series 1–8 International Gladiators 1–2, The Ashes 1–2, The Springbok Challenge 1 Wembley 1993–1994, Sheffield 1995, Wembley 1996, The Royal Tournament 1997

Notes: Both Cobra and Lightning were never originally intended to be Gladiators. Instead, they trained and entered as contestants, and it wasn't until hours before the first recording that it was decided two more Gladiators would be required for the series. This is the reason neither appear on the cover of the music CD that was released to accompany the series. They were both upgraded to full-time participants in show three, and both remained until the very end of the programme.

Fox originally appeared as a contestant during the Wembley live shows of 1993. She was hand-picked to be a reserve Gladiator for the sixth series, however, she ended up becoming a full-time participant after Gold injured herself during training. When the British series ended, Fox became a member of the South African Gladiators team, appearing in their final domestic season.

Laser originally trained and entered as a contestant, but was later made into a reserve Gladiator. However, she ended up becoming a full-time participant after Nightshade injured herself during an event. When she appeared in the first Springbok Challenge, she appeared as a Gladiator for her native South Africa and her Gladiator name was changed to Sheena.

Vulcan joined the British Gladiators series after his native Australian edition of the series was cancelled. In international Gladiators 2 and both Ashes competitions, he competed for Australia.

Wolf later became the team coach for the new set of Gladiators, who appeared in the 2008 revival of the series.

Diesel and Vulcan only participated in the "Battle of the Giants" special in season 8.

InventorEdit

Based on the American game show American Gladiators.

LinksEdit

Official Site

YouTube LinksEdit

Clips of the Show
First Show
Revival Series 1
Revival Series 2